The Truth about the Himalayan Salt. If you find out, you will not use it anymore

Himalayan salt has become a must-have in everyone’s kitchen after being persistently promoted and praised for its beneficial properties. But a few people know that the product marketed under this name comes not from the Himalayas, but from Pakistan.

Himalayan salt has become a must-have in everyone's kitchen after being persistently promoted and praised for its beneficial properties. But a few people know that the product marketed under this name comes not from the Himalayas, but from Pakistan.

The Truth about the Himalayan Salt

The miraculous Himalayan salt, which is found in industrial quantities everywhere, is exploited in the Khewra mine in Pakistan, unrelated to the mountain range that gives it its name.

 

This pink salt is part of a top 10 of the most marketed food products, acquiring a well-established role both in alternative medicine and in the cosmetics industry.

 

Interest in miraculous salt arose in the 1990s, after a self-proclaimed German biophysician claimed to have discovered the healing properties of salt from the Himalayan Multitudes; they were kept intact because the salt would come from uncontaminated areas of pollution or human intervention.

 

Besides the “vital energy” stored in salt crystals, it has been suggested that it contains “84 chemical elements essential to the human body.”

 

In the meantime, the salt recorded premium sales, and commercial success led to the German Peter Ferreira, who launched the information, to launch a whole marketing strategy, organizing seminars, workshops, video information materials, culminating in the publication of a books “Water & Salt – Essence of Life”, becoming the best seller of 2002.

The Truth about the Himalayan Salt

Despite its much-trumped properties, the Italian Nutrition Society reports that the human body only needs 24 chemical elements – not 84! – and 15 of them are needed for daily consumption. Of the 24, there are no clear studies for all, so there is a question mark with regard to the remaining 60 elements contained in the so-called Himalayan salt – what are they and what are they using !?

 

Returning to the pink hue of salt, it comes from the iron it holds. Certain deposits in Germany, such as Bad Reichenall or Berchtesgaden, also contain such a pink salt. But in addition to the iron content, the content of other metals, some of which are potentially dangerous, has not been verified.

 

So the whole mythology woven around the “salt of the Himalayas” is rather a scam in order to collect money.

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